HPEF presents Infinitus 2010, a Harry Potter conference            TEXT  MENU

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July 15-18, 2010
Orlando, Florida

Growing Up Potter and the Effects on the Classroom - Canceled
Krista Domin

Growing up in the Potter generation is a life changing experience.  The youth of the Potter generation had not been reading as much as previous generations, there were more options, television, the internet, video games, so for so many to put down these things and read was astonishing.  As someone who grew up in this Potter generation, I have seen an increased interest in literature.  Rowling created a language and story everyone knows and can relate to, and if you don’t know the story or language the Potter community (which spans generation, gender and culture lines) it is shocking.

Growing up Potter, has also effected the classrooms.  Using Rowling’s story in the classrooms can be a powerful tool, there is a common theme to base discussions on, and get students interested in reading again.  The characters and themes Rowling uses are found elsewhere throughout literature.  If these connections can be made, classics can become more popular and relevant in the classrooms again.

As society, culture and generations change the curriculum from elementary all through college must be changed to keep students interested and current in their fields.  While Rowling’s novels are slated as children’s literature and are not yet classics, using them to connect to the classics for all students can be an effective way of relating the classics to present day life, showing how themes and mythology are timeless as they keep re-appearing.  Though every generation gives them a bit of a twist of their own.

I will be discussing growing up in the Potter generation, my own experience, as well as ties from the Rowling novels to classics and Greek Mythology.  I will also discuss the use of Latin, and how Rowling’s novels improve classroom vocabulary, as well as creativity and critical thinking.

Krista Domin graduated from the University System of New Hampshire in 2008 with a BA in English Literature.  She is currently pursuing a Masters degree in Educational Leadership with a focus in English at UCF.
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