HPEF presents Infinitus 2010, a Harry Potter conference            TEXT  MENU

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July 15-18, 2010
Orlando, Florida

Just Because He Died in the Forest, Does it have to be a Christian Book?
Amy Martin, Rachael Vaughn  

Since publication of the final book in the Potter series countless commentaries have explored the Christian content of the series. Some have gone so far to suggest that a Christian interpretation is the only legitimate reading. Yet the series itself has found unprecedented worldwide popularity amongst diverse peoples and cultures. This discussion will explore the meaning of the Potter series from a variety of viewpoints (Jewish, Muslim, secular) to determine if there is room for more than a Christian viewpoint as well as the reaction of many non-Christians to the perceived exclusivity of the current trend.


Amy Martin is a prosecuting attorney for the State of California and a frequent contributor to various Harry Potter discussions. Particularly late at night in various hotel rooms after a cocktail. She particularly enjoys debating the morals and values set forth in the plain text with professors of literature, philosophy and theology bringing a legal assessment to the dispute. She successfully prosecuted JK Rowling last year at Azcatraz for crimes committed against her readership, obtaining a guilty verdict on all counts.

Mild mannered intellectual property attorney by day and rabid fan girl by night, Rachael Vaughn has formerly checked herself into the Snarky the Owl Foundation for Recovering Snape Addicts. Although she named one of her beloved poodles Remus Lupin, Rachael is 100% devoted to the Potions Master. She will participate in almost any type of “Snape-ing” imaginable and spends a good deal of her time making Snape-related fan videos and overanalyzing every aspect of Snape's character on Snapecast. Her personal opinion is that any use of third party copyrighted material associated with her Snape obsession clearly qualifies as fair use under 17 USC 107.

Formal Programming